Women Who Explore Groningen: These boots are made for walking

By Natalie Lange

Overlooking the busy Gedempte Zuiderdiep street, the cacophony of laughing and chatting women in the cozy café, drown out the sounds of passing vehicles. These women have never met before, yet I can see the first bonds of friendship forming. This is the maiden meeting of the group, Women Who Explore Groningen, a women’s group founded by women, for women.

Kayla Ihrig (25) who works as a freelance graphic designer, is an international ambassador for Women Who Explore, and she recently started the first Women Who Explore community in the Netherlands, here in Groningen. She sees value in bringing women together and was inspired to start a group for like-minded women in the city.

“I hope it becomes a place of real community, where people know each other’s names and lives, and are excited to come together. I think it will happen, which to me is really the dream,” says Ihrig.

Women Who Explore is a community for women of any age and nationality. It is an international organization that focuses on group outdoor events with the goal to connect women who enjoy exploring nature. The organization started in Canada, but now has groups in the States, Africa, Philippines and Europe.

As an ambassador, Ihrig organizes monthly meetings, using a private Facebook group to connect with interested group members. “A happy, active group is my goal, whatever that number looks like,” she says.

Ihrig herself moved to Groningen from Chicago only nine months ago. “Moving here was a massive change in every way,” she says. She moved to Groningen for her partner and didn’t have any real attachment to this place initially. After a while, she managed to meet friends through Facebook groups and the expat community of the city, which helped her a lot to acclimate to life as a Groningen resident.

“Part of my motivation for starting the group was to get to know the Netherlands better, to feel more connected to the country and see what beauty it has,” says Ihrig. Her vision is to meet up twice a month, once outdoors, exploring the Netherlands, and another time over a cup of coffee in the vibrant city of Groningen. 

The Women Who Explore Groningen community was founded in February 2019 and gained more than 200 members within the first week of its creation. The organization is the second women’s group existing in Groningen. Unlike Young Women of Groningen Meet Up, which focuses on social events within Groningen, Women Who Explore focuses on exploring the outdoors all around the Netherlands.

The first meeting of the group was held on Sunday the 17th of March 2019 at the Taveerne Rabenhaupt and was attended by around 30 women.  

“I was really happy with the turnout, but I was much more excited to see people talking, making new friends, and being excited about doing things together” says Ihrig. She received a lot of enthusiasm from women about finding a group to go do things with. “I’ve been really touched and energized by the feedback and interest,” she says.

“The sky is the limit for the group.”

The one night stand

Let’s Talk about Periods

By Clémence Waller

“You seem pissed off, are you on your period?”

“Really, it shouldn’t be talked about in public, this is a private issue.”

NOPE. Sit down ladies and gentlemen, we need to set some things straight as this affects everyone, women and men.

Before I start, I want to say that I do understand that not all women have periods and that not everyone that has a period is a woman. I am writing this in mind of anyone who does have to go through periods, regardless of their gender.

Periods are messy: yes. Can they be painful? Sometimes, depends on the person. Are they optional? No! Is it “normal”? HELL YES! Is Period Poverty real? Yes! Should it be? No!

So What Is It All About?

Quick recap for those of you who have never heard of this natural phenomenon. Periods are when someone’s body expels blood from their uterus and out their vagina. This process allows the body to eliminate the old uterus lining, avoid infections and clean out the space for a fresh new set up to welcome an eventual baby.

Think of it as a monthly deep clean of the oven so you can put a fresh bun in it.

It is understandable why, at first, this topic may make some of us uncomfortable, both male and female. You are practically bleeding for 5-10 days without dying. That’s some Walking Dead shit right there!

It sounds scary: sometimes women who go through it, experience unpleasant emotional and physical changes because hormones are playing tag in their body. But it is a completely natural, healthy process and talking about it, educating both boys and girls about it, is the only way to break the taboo that affects half the population.

It’s not “dirty”, it’s not “sinful” or “disgusting”, it’s just a process you have to go through once a month.

A Matter of Dignity

In 2015 Christian Eckert, a French politician compared his razor and shaving cream to be equally important or vital to men’s dignity as period pads or tampons are to women. To paraphrase Sophia Aram, French comedian: between his opinion and toilet paper, toilet paper has more value.

If a man does not shave, his dignity is not affected. Men have a choice whether or not they want a beard, most women do not have a choice about whether or not to have a period. Aunt Flow is coming at some point during the month, you just need to be ready for her when she does.

Ladies, who has not asked another female at least once, if she had a pad or a tampon because you got caught off guard?  Who here has not gone into a public bathroom hoping she had enough change to pay for a pad? That fear of standing up and revealing that bright red stain on your butt that screams “I’M ON MY PERIOD! I’M SO ASHAMED AND DIRTY”, is very real and it’s time to do away with this once and for all.

Gentlemen, who has not been asked at least once by a close female relative or significant other if they could go to the store to get an emergency supply of tampons or pads? Why is it so embarrassing or “emasculating” to help out a woman you love who is in need? Tampons and period pads are no more embarrassing to buy than pants or shirts. You need clothes in order to go out and about in society and menstruating women need these products to do the same.

In 2016 France finally reduced the taxation on female hygienic products from 21% to 5,5% (the standard first necessities rate throughout most of Europe, barring a few exceptions such as Italy at 22%). Whilst this reduction is absolutely a great way forward, the cost of these necessities still adds up to a hefty monthly and yearly budget. There is still more that can be done, like having social security cover part of the cost. Scotland has already made a landmark decision and is making period pads and tampons free for students and low-income women; more countries should follow this example.

A Violation of Human Rights

In Western Europe we are “lucky” in certain ways that we can shout out about our periods or talk about them more or less openly, however that is not the case for everybody.  In December 2016 a young Nepalese girl died of poor ventilation in a hut she had been exiled to during her menstruation as part of the Chaupadi ritual. Women should not have to be put in physical danger just because they are experiencing a non-optional biological phenomenon.

In France, in schools of disadvantaged neighborhoods, girls find themselves unable to afford period pads and schools are having budgetary trouble providing them to girls. In the US, Medicaid, SNAP and WIC don’t cover the cost of hygiene products as they are deemed “luxuries”. I can promise policy makers that anyone who has to go through periods does not feel that glamorous or luxurious.

In the UK one in ten women between the ages of 14-21 cannot afford period products and girls find themselves skipping school for fear of staining their uniforms. At this point this becomes not only a health issue, but also an educational one.

An important female demographic to consider who are severely impacted by period poverty would be homeless women and incarcerated women. These members of our society are unable to receive regular income to pay for those expensive products and so are forced into a situation that not only compromises their dignity but also their health.  

In 2017, the British charity Shelter estimated that 68,000 women were sleeping rough on the streets, in emergency housing or shelters. In an address in the house of commons Paula Sherriff explained that the government funds homeless shelters to buy condoms and razors but not sanitary products.  They have to rely on charitable donations for those. Homeless women have said that to cope, they makeshift their own sanitary products by ripping up socks, clothes and even stuffing newspaper in their underwear. They sometimes overuse their sanitary products which can lead to dangerous diseases such as toxic shock syndrome.

Incarcerated girls and women face similar problems. In Arizona state, female detainees are allowed on 12 pads a month. Any person who has had heavy flow periods will know that 12 pads may not be enough. These women are paid 15 cents an hour and have to pay for extra pads via the commissary, which charges them full retail price. Detainees are often forced to come up with alternative solutions to sanitary products, have to barter amongst themselves or ‘free bleed’.  

A bill was proposed in February of this year to combat this and was decided by a panel of nine men. Not a single woman was on the judging committee. In the UK, women are often left to bleed in their cells and do not have access to water to wash their hands. With restrictions to their access to affordable sanitary care, female detainees are constantly humiliated and their dignity discarded.

As part of the western world, we often laud ourselves in being nations that respect human rights and hold human dignity to a high standard. Women and any person who has periods are included in the word ‘human’. Article 3 of the European convention of Human Rights provides that “No one shall be subjected to torture or to inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment”.  This is an absolute right. In laymen’s terms, under no circumstances are any member nations of this convention allowed to breach this basic human right. By denying sanitary products to the women that cannot afford them, their human rights are being violated.

So What Can We Do?

Period Poverty needs to end. This is not asking for special treatment or considerations, this is asking for basic respect. Make period products affordable and accessible to all so that we can achieve our full individual potential and give back to society.

All in all: be cool, support women who are menstruating by supporting initiatives that make period products accessible and affordable, donate pads and tampons to local charities and go with the Flow.

Peace.